Tag Archives: #Newcastle

One fine day

James

Yesterday was my first foray back into Newcastle and I caught a fresh exhibition at The Lock Up. Click the link to read more if you so desire. Cheers!

thelaymanreviewer.wordpress.com/2017-2/one-fine-day/

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Union Steamship Company plus 1.

Out and about in Newcastle last week and I popped into a business that’s adding to their rooms many a local art work. I think more businesses could follow in their wake. Anyway click the link to read more.

https://thelaymanreviewer.wordpress.com/2017-2/union-steam-ship-company/

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A review in pictures

Hi all. Today I am going to inundate you with many pictures of art because I just want to. There have been a few exhibitions I’ve been to recently around town and as has happened all too often, many of these exhibitions have finished but for those who can’t always get to the galleries here is a snapshot from the past couple of weeks. I’ll begin with those exhibitions that are still open. Cheers!

Click the link to read more.

https://thelaymanreviewer.wordpress.com/2017-2/a-review-in-pictures/

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The Phantom Show

Who is a fan of The Phantom? If you are than you must go and see The Phantom Show  at Newcastle Art Gallery. Now I admit that I’m not a die-hard having never picked up a comic (well I have though it was an Archie) but it’s not a problem. This  travelling exhibition is all about fun and appreciating some great capabilities with medium. Apparently 40 years ago when our gallery was a spring chicken it was host to the first Phantom show and Peter Kingston, one of the original artists has come back to curate alongside Dietmar Lederwasch.

Plenty of locals have managed to squeeze onto the walls of the gallery and their work is often a highlight of the exhibition. Michael Bell is always a favourite of mine. He’s the artist that always harnesses the fun spirit alongside great painting techniques. MB’s canvases truly suit the soul of the event. Tony Abbott as The Phantom had me chuckling. This sculpture by John Turier captures the political times to perfection. I also found the humour of Dino Consalvo’s Phantom appealing. Both Turier and Consalvo have exhibitions at ASW this year Turier’s opening 1st July and Consalvo’s  in September.

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I was pleasantly surprised to find an interpretation by Elisabeth Cummings.  The portrait is intense, the sitter (which is the curator himself Peter Kingston) seeming to study the artist with resignation almost. Her use of the paint would make it seem the work was rapidly executed and it works well. I particularly like the background.  This artist is a living treasure.

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I also have to include the work of Euan Macleod whose layered painting is heavy with texture and storytelling. His capacity to incorporate what would appear to be a comic strip into a painting and also create a stand out composition is considerable.

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I might add here that the exhibition is dominated by the male of the artist species with only a smattering of female’s gracing the walls. With the lower floor of the gallery dedicated to the female abstraction exhibition it is a balancing act of sorts. We’re a spoilt city at present with the gallery bursting with history and brilliant art. It’s just a shame those funds for its extension seem to be as evasive as ever.

Anyway get in to see The Phantom before 20th August.

Yours in art for the time being…

 

Abstraction

It’s been over a week since I’ve seen it but I can’t not write about the NGA’s travelling exhibition at the Newcastle Regional. This exhibition of Australian women abstract artists is a paid exhibition so be forewarned. If you forget and wander in unaware you will be chased. It’s a small fee though and with the addition of a complimentary booklet, I think worth it. It’s not a large exhibition but there are some great works. And some unfamiliar names (for me anyway). Such as Inge King whose work is remarkable for its recognisable shape and place amongst other non-figurative sculpture of the mid 20th century. Because I’m unfamiliar with her work perhaps there are more sculptures in her oeuvre that identify personally with the artist rather than of the time.

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Janet Dawson’s lithograph work titled “Night Bird” had me rather excited. The combination of colour and shape, simple yet elegant is timeless. Lithograph is a mystery to me having skipped this technique in art school but I always seem to admire the finished works. Her three lithograph works in this exhibition date back to 1960.

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There’s also the familiar name Margaret Preston whose work I never tire of seeing. She has three works in the show all woodcut prints and all recognisable. Grace Crowley whose work from 1928 titled “Sailors and models” is fascinating for its patina and reference to cubism. I couldn’t help thinking of the cubist work of the French artist Fernand Leger when viewing this work.

 

This exhibition is divided up into 6 sub genres and I’ve bounced around a bit with sequence but on the whole it runs from earliest works to most recent. While wandering about the gallery I frequently returned to the early work from last century where colours were more subdued and quiet. Such as the abstract expressionist work of Yvonne Audette. The texture, emotion and determined movement of materials about the canvas beckoned me to keep returning to it. It’s the highlight of the exhibition for me. But of course it’s subjective this art viewing and perhaps the more strident works of the minimalists might appeal to others more.

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Anyway it’s worth taking a look and the more who attend the more likely we are to get more travelling exhibitions coming to Newcastle. Cheers!